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Entries in color (7)

Tuesday
Jul202010

CMYK

Refers to the color model for printing; Cyan, Magenta, Yellow & Key Black. The CMYK model is a subtractive model in which colors subtract from the brightness of the white. 'K' is used in place of 'B' to eliminate any confusion with the color blue and has become the standard symbol for black in all graphic applications.

Tuesday
Jul202010

Cool Tone Paper

The terms cool and warm are used as descriptions for the hue of paper whiteness. Cool tone papers are generally more blue whereas warm tone papers are more yellow.

Tuesday
Jul202010

Gamut

Gamut (or color gamut) refers to the subset of colors that can be accurately produced by a device. The larger the color gamut the more colors that can be accurately represented. Every device is capable of representing a unique color gamut. Different combinations of ink and paper will also result in variations in the color gamut represented.

Tuesday
Jul202010

How can I profile my display?

There are several ways to profile your display, or in other words standardize the color displayed depending on the level of accuracy required. The easiest method is to use your monitors build in calibration tools. Some displays, like those on Apple computers use a system of visual cues to set the contrast, color, and brightness of a monitor. This can be found in the Sytem Preferences > Display > Color > Calibrate... Apple has a great tutorial on display calibration.

While this method is a good start, it is not 100% accurate. 

X-rite Eye One (i1) Display 2

We recommend going one step further and using a specialized color calibration tool like the X-rite Eye-One series. This will ensure that your display meets measurable color standards.

Tuesday
Jul202010

RGB

RGB or (Red, Green & Blue) is a color model in which these three colors can be coupled to produce a large array of different colors that are seen by the eye.

RGB color is known as additive color theory and is used in all displays like computer monitors and televisions. The combination of red, green, and blue results in the color white.

Monday
Jul192010

The paper I want to print on is not listed in my printer driver, can I still use it? Do I need an ICC profile?

The short answer is yes. Each printer manufacturer creates basic paper settings and names them according to their branded products. Using a similar setting will in general provide a good starting point. Most printer drivers also include advanced tools to adjust the ink and color to effectively create your own settings. ICC profiles do this work for you so we recommend finding or creating a customer profile for the best results.

Tuesday
Jul202010

Warm Tone Paper

The terms cool and warm are used as descriptions for the hue of paper whiteness. Cool tone papers are generally more blue whereas warm tone papers are more yellow.